Document-reading Workshop: Feasting at the Tennō's Table
Mar
26
3:00 PM15:00

Document-reading Workshop: Feasting at the Tennō's Table

A banquet scene from the Tokyo National Museum’s copy of the Illustrated Scroll of Annual Events (Nenjugyōji emaki).

A banquet scene from the Tokyo National Museum’s copy of the Illustrated Scroll of Annual Events (Nenjugyōji emaki).

What did the early medieval Japanese monarch eat at banquets and his daily meals?  How was the food prepared and served?  Professor Akemi Banse of the University of Tokyo Historiographical Institute will examine these questions in a document-reading workshop focusing on courtier diaries between the eleventh and thirteenth centuries.  The workshop will take place from 3-5 PM on March 26 in room 110C of the East Asian Library (Doheny Library), University of Southern California.  

Professor Banse, an associate professor at the Institute, studies the Heian and Kamakura periods (794-1333), especially political issues, women and gender, and estates.  

Location: Doheny Library, East Asian Library 110 C

Document: 『日中行事』東山御文庫本 Download
Supplemental Materials: English Seiryōden Background; Japanese Palace Maps ; Draft OCR text

Questions? Send us an email.
Feasting at the Tenno's Table .jpg
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Dec
30
11:00 AM11:00

Research Recap 2018: Janet Goodwin

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Q: Dr. Janet Goodwin, what have you been up to in the last year?

A: Land, Power, and the Sacred:  The Estate System in Medieval Japan was published this summer, to the delight of all; I am collaborating with Sakurai Eiji on a chapter for the new Cambridge History of Japan, focusing on itinerant and settled merchants (Sakurai's part) and itinerant and marginalized groups (my part);  I have translated a chapter for the same volume by Yoshie Akiko, on kingship and state formation in the archipelago from the third through the early 8th century.  I spent two weeks in Japan in November, visiting such sites as the Ueno National Museum and Science Museum in Tokyo, Sanjūsangendō in Kyoto, the Kurozuka kofun and its museum in Tenri, and the Ōsu Kannonji and the science museum and planetarium in Nagoya.  Now home, I am devoting my life to my cat.

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Summer Research Recap: Emily Warren
Sep
8
11:00 AM11:00

Summer Research Recap: Emily Warren

This summer, I had the opportunity to both further my professional Japanese as well as conduct research. I was based out of Yokohama, Japan, where I attended the Inter-University Center for Japanese Language Studies. During the program, we were trained in giving presentations, and academic reading and writing. At the end of the program, I gave a short talk on my research and current project, translating the Chûjiruiki, a thirteenth century text on preparing food for elites at court.

My training at the IUC was complemented by excursions and meetings outside of Yokohama. I traveled down to Ise, Mie Prefecture, where I visited the Jingu Chokokan, a museum dedicated to shrines and Shinto rites. The main museum exhibition focused on offering food to kami, rites that many scholars connect with early food customs at Court. The Jingu Chokokan also had a small museum on agricultural history, where I could take useful pictures and notes for teaching as well as see old tools.

While I was working on my Chûjiruiki translation, I took numerous trips to the Ajinomoto Food Studies library in Tokyo. There, I was able to use their large collection of secondary scholarship and consider a future project on early modern materials, as the library has a large early modern cook book collection. While there, I was able to meet the director of the library, laying the foundation for future work at Ajinomoto. Ajinomoto was also hosting a small exhibition on Edo period seasonality and kabuki, a topic I wrote a research paper on last semester.

Finally, towards the end of my stay, I visited Keio University's library and the Keio Institute of Oriental Classics (Shido Bunko), where Professor Takashiro Sasaki introduced me to rare materials in the collection from the late medieval and early modern. As we examined scrolls and books, we also considered future ways to work with the Keio collections, in particular their large, recently acquired catalog of food-related sources from the Takahashi family. Professor Takahashi also was gracious enough to introduce me to the rare book sellers of Jimbocho, who pulled items relating to food culture for us to examine.

This was an invaluable summer that not only allowed me to pursue expected avenues and projects, such as my Chûjiruiki translation and IUC Japanese training, but also introduced me to new, previously unknown resources, such as the collection at Keio and acquisitions in Jimbocho.

Accepting my IUC diploma.

Outside the Jingu Chokokan to see their exhibitions on food offerings and agriculture.

Outside the Jingu Chokokan to see their exhibitions on food offerings and agriculture.

Left: Outside the Ajinomoto research library. Right: Participating in a uchimizu event in front of the Ajinomoto headquarters with staff.

Pictures from my trip to Keio University. Here, I am examining Early Modern satire books that use food to make humorous comparisons with famous locations.

Pictures from my trip to Keio University. Here, I am examining Early Modern satire books that use food to make humorous comparisons with famous locations.

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Kyoto Institute and Library Archives (KILA) - USC Postdoc Program Launch
Aug
11
to Oct 31

Kyoto Institute and Library Archives (KILA) - USC Postdoc Program Launch

The USC Project for Premodern Japan Studies is pleased to announce our new relationship with the Kyoto Institute and Library Archives (KILA) in Kyoto, a center of research comprised of Kyoto University and the Kyoto Prefectural Library. Beginning in 2018 postdoctoral fellows recommended by USC can apply to become foreign researchers at KILA. We note with pleasure that our first postdoctoral fellow there will be Dr. Dan Sherer, who received his Ph.D. Degree from USC’s History Department in Summer 2017. While in residence there, beginning in Fall 2018, Dr. Sherer will continue his studies of sixteenth-century Kyoto, especially the development of the Hokke (Lotus) Sect in the late medieval capital city.

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USC-UCSB Tokugawa History Seminar
Jan
25
to May 3

USC-UCSB Tokugawa History Seminar

Every Thursday of the Spring Semester, students from USC and UCSB will meet virtually, video-conferencing to discuss the major works on Tokugawa history published in the last decade. Twenty scholars and students have come together for this exciting new project in education and pedagogy. Dr. Luke Roberts of UCSB leads the seminar. Join us!

Thursdays, 3:30-6:30. ACB 2nd Floor

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Todaiji Ôi Estate Lecture
Apr
13
4:00 PM16:00

Todaiji Ôi Estate Lecture

Prof. Motoo Endō of the University of Tokyo’s Historiographical Institute visited USC on April 13-14, 2017, to present a lecture and sources workshop concerning his research on Todaiji’s Ôi Estate, located in present day Gifu city. He gave a lecture on comparing premodern Japanese estates (shôen), coming Ôi and Ôbe estates, particularly their geographical, political, and economic characteristics. 

On Friday, he led a workshop on late Heian and Medieval documents. English translations of the documents and materials are forthcoming. Professor Endō has led several Kambun Workshops in summers past at USC, and he is a participant in the ongoing Ōbe Estate Research Group and the team that produced Land, Power, and the Sacred: The Estate System in Medieval Japan (now in press at the University of Hawai'i Press). 

Supplementary Materials:
Kambun Powerpoint One and Two
Kambun Documents

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"Tōji Hyakugō monjo Web," Tōji Research, and the Consciousness of Estate Cultivators
Jul
15
3:00 PM15:00

"Tōji Hyakugō monjo Web," Tōji Research, and the Consciousness of Estate Cultivators

Prof. Toshiko TAKAHASHI (Univ. of Tokyo, Historiographical Institute)
Lecture in conjunction with the 2016 Summer Kambun Workshop
"Tōji Hyakugō monjo Web," Tōji Research, and the Consciousness of Estate Cultivators.
3:00 – 5:00 PM, East Asia Seminar Room (Doheny 110C)

flier

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Twelfth-Century Innovations in the Formative Processes of the Shōen System
Nov
5
4:00 PM16:00

Twelfth-Century Innovations in the Formative Processes of the Shōen System

Prof. Saho KAMAKURA (Tokyo Metropolitan University)
Lecture and Workshop
Twelfth-Century Innovations in the Formative Processes of the Shōen System

Respondants: Prof. Suzanne Gay (Oberlin College) and Dr. Sachiko Kawai (Harvard University)

Co-sponsored with the USC Shinso Ito Center for Japanese Religion and Culture

November 5:
Lecture: "Twelfth-Century Innovations in the Formative Processes of the Shōen System"
4:15  - 6:00 PM, East Asian Seminar Room (Doheny Library)

November 6:
Workshop
11:00 AM - 1:00 PM, Herklotz Room, Music Library (Doheny)

flier

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State Formation in the Center and Eastern Periphery of Kofun Period Japan
Apr
20
4:00 PM16:00

State Formation in the Center and Eastern Periphery of Kofun Period Japan

Prof. Ken'ichi SASAKI (Meiji University)
Lecture Series
State Formation in the Center and Eastern Periphery of Kofun Period Japan

April 20:
Talk 1: Japanese theories of state formation
Talk 2: Appearance of keyhole-shaped tumuli in the middle and late third century
4:00 - 6:00 PM, WPH 204

April 21:

Talk 3: Distribution of iron armor in the fifth century and its political significance
Talk 4: Corridor-style burial chambers and clustered tumuli in the sixth century
4:30 - 6:30 PM, East Asian Seminar Room (Doheny Library)

flier

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Feb
5
1:30 PM13:30

Current Historiography on the Shōen System

Current Historiography on the Shōen System
Workshop
Prof. Joan Piggott, Dr. Jan Goodwin, Sachiko Kawai (University of Southern California)

Workshop participants reviewed and discussed key points and debates as inspired by their reading of the recent Shōenshi kenkyū handobukku edited by the Shōenshi kenkyūkai and published by Tokyodo shuppan in 2013.

February 5: Heian Section
led by Sachiko Kawai (ABD)

February 6: Kamakura Section
February 7: Muromachi Section
leb by Dan Sherer (ABD) and Michelle Damian (ABD)

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Talks by Akiko Yoshie and Yoko Ijuin
Apr
22
1:00 PM13:00

Talks by Akiko Yoshie and Yoko Ijuin

April 22-24, 2013


Prof. Akiko Yoshie, Teikyo University
Dr. Yōko Ijuin
Lecture Series on Gender and Ritsuryō Law

April 22: Prof. Akiko Yoshie, Aspects of Gender in The Tale of Genji, Seen through the Illustrated Diary of Murasaki Shikibu
12:45 - 1:30 PM, Doheny Library Room 241

April 22:  Prof. Akiko Yoshie, Family, Marriage and Law in Classical Times, the Law on Residence Units
3:30 - 6:00 PM, Doheny Library Room 241
a translation of the paper given

April 24: Dr. Yōko Ijuin, Women in the Classical Bureaucracy, as Seen in the Ritsuryō Laws and the Historiography to Date
3:30 - 6:00, SOS B51
a translation of the paper given

flier

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